CCTV.com - CNTV English - CCTV News

Yoshihiko Noda wins Japan's ruling party presidential election

08-29-2011 14:43 BJT Special Report:Japanese PM Naoto Kan Resigns |

TOKYO, Aug. 29 (Xinhua) -- Finance minister Yoshihiko Noda is almost certain to become Japan's next prime minister after beating economy, trade and industry minister Banri Kaieda in a run-off to win the ruling Democratic Party of Japan (DPJ) presidential election Monday.

Japanese Finance Minister Yoshihiko Noda gives a speech after winning Japan's ruling party presidential election in Tokyo, Japan, Aug. 29, 2011. Finance minister Yoshihiko Noda is almost certain to become Japan's next prime minister after beating Economy, Trade and Industry Minister Banri Kaieda in a run-off to win the ruling Democratic Party of Japan (DPJ) presidential election Monday. (Xinhua/Ji Chunpeng)

Noda, 54, will become the third prime minister since Democratic Party of Japan (DPJ) swept to power in a historic general election two years ago, as well as Japan's sixth premier in just five years.

Noda, a fiscal hawk, garnered 215 ballots out of the total of 392 valid votes, compared with 177 of Kaieda, who is backed by DPJ powerbroker Ichiro Ozawa who has the largest intraparty faction.

Japanese Finance Minister Yoshihiko Noda bows after winning Japan's ruling party presidential election in Tokyo, Japan, Aug. 29, 2011. Finance minister Yoshihiko Noda is almost certain to become Japan's next prime minister after beating Economy, Trade and Industry Minister Banri Kaieda in a run-off to win the ruling Democratic Party of Japan (DPJ) presidential election Monday. (Xinhua/Ji Chunpeng)

Kaieda led in the first-round voting. But neither of the two managed to win the majority in the first-round voting in a crowded election, which is also joined by former foreign minister Seiji Maehara, agriculture, forestry and fisheries minister Michihiko Kano, and former transport minister Sumio Mabuchi.

The election is boiled down to the fierce competition of supporters and enemies of Ozawa, dubbed as the "Shadow Shogun" who masterminded DPJ's victory to power. Ozawa himself was barred from voting as his membership was suspended following indictment earlier this year over a political fund scandal.

Japanese Finance Minister Yoshihiko Noda greets his supporters after winning Japan's ruling party presidential election in Tokyo, Japan, Aug. 29, 2011. Finance minister Yoshihiko Noda is almost certain to become Japan's next prime minister after beating Economy, Trade and Industry Minister Banri Kaieda in a run-off to win the ruling Democratic Party of Japan (DPJ) presidential election Monday. (Xinhua/Ji Chunpeng)

Maehara and Noda's camps joined forces in the second-round as they share similar power base in the party. Both are distant from Ozawa.

Noda, who has vowed to cut public debt through fiscal reforms, including a proposed increase in the 5 percent sales tax, is in favor of the DPJ forming a grand coalition with opposition parties

Japanese Finance Minister Yoshihiko Noda bows after winning Japan's ruling party presidential election in Tokyo, Japan, Aug. 29, 2011. Finance minister Yoshihiko Noda is almost certain to become Japan's next prime minister after beating Economy, Trade and Industry Minister Banri Kaieda in a run-off to win the ruling Democratic Party of Japan (DPJ) presidential election Monday. (Xinhua/Ji Chunpeng)

Noda has said that he supports reducing Japan's reliance on nuclear power but cannot envision a Japan entirely free of nuclear energy.

His foreign policy initiatives may be thwarted following controversial comments made about Japanese wartime leaders. This year on the anniversary of Japan's World War II surrender he said that Japanese Class-A war criminals were in fact not war criminals.

Outgoing Prime Minister Naoto Kan resigned as party chief Friday after seeing the passage in the Diet of two key bills -- one on the issuance of debt-covering bonds and one on the promotion of renewable energy. Kan is the longest-serving premier in five years.

Noda will have to cope with challenges including reviving a stagnant economy, rebuilding the disaster- devastated areas, ending the world's worst nuclear crisis since Chernobyl in Fukushima, arresting a surging yen which threatens export, and seeking cooperation from opposition parties in a divided diet.

Editor:Wang Xiaomei |Source: Xinhua

Hot Videos view more

The celebrations are still continuing as the victorious coach, Joachim Loew, has been honored for his achievement in his hometown of Freiburg.
Germany coach Loew honored in hometown of Freiburg

Chinese men´s national team continued its preparations for next year´s Asian Cup, as they managed a one-all draw against visitors Jordan during a football friendly in Harbin, the capital city of Northeast China´s Heilongjiang Province.
China held to 1-1 draw by Jordan

The defending world champs came into the contest with a perfect 6-and-oh record, but they would be in for a tough first half before opening things up in the second.
USA beat Slovenia 119-76 in quarter-finals

Hot Stories more

UK authorities believe killer of James Foley is a British national

Across the UK the hunt is on for James Foley’s killer, who authorities believe is a British national. As Richard Bestic reports from London, Prime Minister David Cameron cut short his summer break to lead his government’s response.

Israeli war jets renews Gaza strike as truce talks stalled

Three Palestinians were killed and 40 others wounded in the intensive Israeli war jets´ airstrikes on the Gaza city on Tuesday night, shortly before an end of a 24-hour ceasefire in the Gaza Strip,

Missouri police arrest dozens after violent night

As the protests in the town of Ferguson, Missouri turned violent with police facing ´heavy gunfire´ from some ´criminal elements´, cops fired tear gas, stun grenades and arrested 31 demonstrators on Monday night.

Picture in news more

More Video News

Choose TV Program