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How to build Asia-Pacific Security Architecture?

Editor: Li Kun 丨CCTV.com

10-22-2015 14:26 BJT

By Li Shouen, CNTV Commentator

The Asia Pacific region has long been one of the hottest topics in geo-politics, especially after the US Pivot to Asia strategy was introduced, along with a rising China in recent years. Sino-US relations, Korean Peninsula issue, South China Sea disputes, etc, together with escalating terrorism, newly-emerged Internet security concerns... have drawn worldwide attention.

The North Pavilion Dialogue themed, “How to build a Asia Pacific security architecture” was held at Peking University on Oct. 19.

The North Pavilion Dialogue themed, "How to build a Asia Pacific security architecture" was held at Peking University on Oct. 19.

Then how should all parties resolve doubts and increase trust, to form a mechanism, which is practical and yet meets the needs of related countries and regions? Should we establish a new security architecture?

To find answers or suggestions over these questions, the North Pavilion Dialogue themed, "How to build a Asia Pacific security architecture" was held at Peking University on Oct. 19.

The Institute of International and Strategic Studies (IISS) has invited 14 high-level experts from the US, South Korea, India, Russia, Singapore and Germany to discuss the international security situation and the role China plays in global affairs with Chinese scholars. IISS President Wang Jisi hosted the dialogue.

Dr. Victor Larin, director of the Institute of History, Archaeology and Ethnography of the Peoples of the Far-east, Russian Academy of Science pointed out several reasons leading to the current "chaotic" world.

Contradictions between the old democracies, including the US, a number of European nations and Japan, as well as the recovering nations, such as Germany, India and Russia are confronting increased tensions to the world order.

The second source involves the remains of history, i.e. the contradictions caused by mutual distrust and misunderstandings between countries and peoples, for example the Korean Peninsula issue, China-Japan relations and the Iranian Nuclear issue, which are challenges to global security.

The third reason is the expectant shortage of resources for social and common development, including land, water and energy.

Then do we need to build a new security structure to ensure peaceful development of the Asia Pacific region?

Both former South Korean Foreign Minister Kim Sung-Hwan and Senior Fellow in the Asia Research Division at the German Institute for International and Security Affairs Gudrun Wacker agreed that it’s not necessary to establish a new framework or architecture.

Instead, they call for a revitalization and improvement of existing mechanisms that include the Shanghai Cooperation Organization (SCO), Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN), Conference on Interaction and Confidence-Building Measures in Asia (CICA) and other bilateral or multi-lateral mechanisms.

To maintain security in the Asia Pacific region, China and the US, the two most important stakeholders of the region, should minimize divergences and strengthen cooperation, according to Kim Sung-Hwan.

His opinion was echoed by George Yeo, former Singaporean foreign minister, who believes that influenced by the traditional Chinese culture, which is characterized by showing restraint to others, Beijing has no ambition to surpass Washington in power status, and there is no necessity to worry that China will export its values.

IISS Vice-president Wang Yizhou thinks the Asia Pacific region stands at a critical juncture: major powers are focusing on this region and rivalries are getting more intense.

Industry in this region is developing rapidly; it’s the fastest increasing economic region in the world, in terms of trading volume and people’s living standards.

How to maintain this trend of development and prosperity? Unlike other regions, there have been no major wars between nations in recent decades, which could necessitate more peaceful development for the region, Prof. Wang noted.

Though there are still frictions on energy, trade, fishing, intellectual property, and nonproliferation etc., if all the parties in the region work together to enhance trust and reduce misunderstandings, respect diversities and minimize divergences, manage disparities and resolve disputes, the Asia Pacific region can maintain its momentum to drive an economic engine of growth for the world.

 

( The opinions expressed here do not necessarily reflect the opinions of Panview or CCTV.com. )

 

 

Panview offers a new window of understanding the world as well as China through the views, opinions, and analysis of experts. We also welcome outside submissions, so feel free to send in your own editorials to "globalopinion@vip.cntv.cn" for consideration.

Panview offers an alternative angle on China and the rest of the world through the analyses and opinions of experts. We also welcome outside submissions, so feel free to send in your own editorials to "globalopinion@vip.cntv.cn" for consideration.

 

 

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